SERIES PREMIERE: CALCULUS

Socratica has just started a new math series on Calculus.

Our first episode is an overview, called  What is Calculus :

This series stars our co-founder, Michael Lee Harrison.  Michael is a mathematician, who has a lot of valuable experience under his belt.  He got his BS in math at Caltech, and continued his studies at UC Berkeley and University of Washington . He holds an MS in math from UW and is ABD on his PhD…we’ll see if we can round up some more abbreviations for our next profile!

Michael taught math at the college level for several years, where he was a good-humoured and encouraging instructor.  He next went into finance, working as a “quant” (quantitative analyst).  He then worked at Google as a developer for five years before leaving to start Socratica.

You’ve seen Michael’s work on Socratica for years now, but this is the VERY FIRST TIME he has stepped in front of the camera.  More to come soon!

KHH

Please subscribe to our YouTube channel, and share with your friends!

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We’d love you to join our team on Patreon:
https://www.patreon.com/socratica

 

 

 

Our Fab Music Videos with Kat McDowell

You hear a lot of advice as a small YouTube channel.  Make more videos!  Tweet every day!  Shareability!  Longer videos!  Likes! Annotations!  Ask them to Subscribe!

But the big piece of advice we never took was: COLLABORATE. 

rising tide lifts all ships

A rising tide lifts all ships, the saying goes, and the idea is that if your channel can help out another, you should do it.  And don’t worry about contacting a channel with more subscribers than you – you could be bringing in a brand-new audience to the bigger channel.  Everyone wins.

It’s easier said than done, of course.  We’ve tried to pull of collaborations before, but something always got in the way:  schedule conflicts, too big of a difference in style, lack of funds.

But this year, with the help of the YouTube NextUp program, we finally did it.  We made two videos with our friend Kat McDowell – one for her channel, and one for ours!

This time, everything went right, the stars aligned, and the fates smiled on us.  We met Kat at an event at YouTube Space LA, and we recognized her from one of our favourite music videos – her cover of “Somewhere Over the Rainbow.” She’s a singer-songwriter from Japan and New Zealand, who makes “positive surf-pop” that will bring a smile to your face.

We knew we wanted to collaborate with Kat, but it was just a matter of finding a time and place to make it happen. Amazingly, we were both selected to take part in the YouTube NextUp program!  This meant we were in the same place at the same time for an entire week, with beautiful filming studios and tons of equipment at our disposal.

SUCCESS!

We hope you enjoy the videos as much as we enjoyed making them.

Here’s the video about Musical Harmony we made for our channel:

 

And here’s the music video “Human” we made for Kat’s channel:

 

 

Remember to tell your friends about Socratica Studios, and encourage them to try our videos and subscribe!

KHH

Subscribe to Socratica Studios

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Support Socratica on Patreon

Don’t forget to check out Kat McDowell’s channel  for more beautiful music! 

 

 

Related Post:

Game Changer: YouTube NextUp

Our YouTube NextUp Classmates

 

Today is his birthday. He had only 20 of them.

French mathematician Evariste Galois was born on this day in 1811.

Evariste Galois (artist: Kim Parkhurst)

Evariste Galois (artist: Kim Parkhurst)

His life was full of promise…and turmoil.  He made major contributions to math while still a teenager, and his work was fundamental for several different fields of math including Galois Theory and Group Theory.

Although his teachers found his writing "incomprehensible."

Although his teachers found his writing “incomprehensible.”

Sadly, he died in a duel when he was only 20.

Hear about his brief impressive life in our Great Thinkers video series

KHH

 

 

A new video series: Great Thinkers

Euclid is associated with geometry (as in “Euclidean Geometry”), but he was also the author of the most successful math textbook of all time:  The Elements.  It has been in fairly continuous use (not counting the Dark Ages) to this day.  His book  – really a collection of 13 books – started with basic principles and taught not only geometry, but the whole of mathematics as known by the ancient Greeks.  We don’t know exactly when he was born or died, or what he really looked like (despite this fetching statue in Oxford):

English: Statue of Euclid in the Oxford Univer...

English: Statue of Euclid in the Oxford University Museum of Natural History. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

What do we know about this most influential fellow?  Here’s a video we made about him, the first in our “Great Thinkers” series.

 

Next up in the series is Galois, a French mathematician with such a tragic story, he really deserves his own opera.

KHH