SERIES PREMIERE – Study Tips – How to be a Great Student – Cornell Notes

This is the FIRST EPISODE of our new series on How to Be a Great Student! In this episode, we learn about the CORNELL METHOD.

 

This is a great method for taking notes in class (or from your textbook, or watching a video). There’s no way to remember every word of a lecture. But taking great lecture notes is the first step to getting good grades and being a great student.

The most important rule is don’t write down every word. Listen carefully, then write simplified and abbreviated phrases that capture the main ideas.

When you get home, RE-READ your notes! Proofread them, making corrections as needed before you forget. Check your notes with a friend! In the margin, write brief headers that will cue your memory of each section of your notes.

Finally, write a summary at the bottom of the page so you can quickly tell what this page of notes is all about.

Do you have a different method of taking notes? Let us know what are your favourite study tips in the comments!

KHH

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Be sure to subscribe so you don’t miss this exciting new series from Socratica:
http://bit.ly/1ixuu9W

And please share with all your friends. They deserve to be great students, too!

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If you’d like to wear our Socratica shirts, please visit our CafePress site: http://bit.ly/28MnOoc
They ship worldwide!!

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Don’t forget to check out our FREE educational apps on the Google Play Store.
http://bit.ly/1MqSHsM

If you’d like to support more great educational videos from Socratica, please consider becoming our Patron on Patreon!
https://www.patreon.com/socratica

 

Related:

Are you curious about how we filmed these videos?  Check out our episode of Socratica Backstage about this video shoot:  Socratica Backstage: Overhead Mirrored Shots

Watch the trailer for our Study Tips: How to Be a Great Student series

 

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Our Fab Music Videos with Kat McDowell

You hear a lot of advice as a small YouTube channel.  Make more videos!  Tweet every day!  Shareability!  Longer videos!  Likes! Annotations!  Ask them to Subscribe!

But the big piece of advice we never took was: COLLABORATE. 

rising tide lifts all ships

A rising tide lifts all ships, the saying goes, and the idea is that if your channel can help out another, you should do it.  And don’t worry about contacting a channel with more subscribers than you – you could be bringing in a brand-new audience to the bigger channel.  Everyone wins.

It’s easier said than done, of course.  We’ve tried to pull of collaborations before, but something always got in the way:  schedule conflicts, too big of a difference in style, lack of funds.

But this year, with the help of the YouTube NextUp program, we finally did it.  We made two videos with our friend Kat McDowell – one for her channel, and one for ours!

This time, everything went right, the stars aligned, and the fates smiled on us.  We met Kat at an event at YouTube Space LA, and we recognized her from one of our favourite music videos – her cover of “Somewhere Over the Rainbow.” She’s a singer-songwriter from Japan and New Zealand, who makes “positive surf-pop” that will bring a smile to your face.

We knew we wanted to collaborate with Kat, but it was just a matter of finding a time and place to make it happen. Amazingly, we were both selected to take part in the YouTube NextUp program!  This meant we were in the same place at the same time for an entire week, with beautiful filming studios and tons of equipment at our disposal.

SUCCESS!

We hope you enjoy the videos as much as we enjoyed making them.

Here’s the video about Musical Harmony we made for our channel:

 

And here’s the music video “Human” we made for Kat’s channel:

 

 

Remember to tell your friends about Socratica Studios, and encourage them to try our videos and subscribe!

KHH

Subscribe to Socratica Studios

Subscribe to Socratica Kids

Support Socratica on Patreon

Don’t forget to check out Kat McDowell’s channel  for more beautiful music! 

 

 

Related Post:

Game Changer: YouTube NextUp

Our YouTube NextUp Classmates

 

Game Changer: YouTube NextUp

A miracle occurred at Socratica Studios last month. Actually, it happened in Playa Vista, which is about an hour east of Socratica Studios.

Playa Vista is the location of YouTube Space LA (YTSLA).  We spent an entire week there, because Socratica was chosen to be in the 2016 class of YouTube NextUp.

YTSLA blue sky

What is YouTube NextUp?  It’s a program run by YouTube to identify and support promising up-and-coming YouTube channels.  Hundreds of YouTube channels applied, and 16 of us were brought to YTSLA for an intensive week-long course in filmmaking and growing your channel. Each channel had an experienced mentor,  and we worked all week with experts in the fields of cinematography, lighting, sound design, set design, greenscreen work, etc. etc.

It’s sort of like finding the golden ticket and being adopted by Willy Wonka.

willy-wonka-golden-ticket

 

Previous winners include ASAP Science (we’re big fans), Ingrid Nilsen, and Cassey Ho (who we actually got to meet and hear about her experience).   So many of them are now well over a million subscribers. It really seems like this is a turning point for the channels in the program.

One of the best things about the NextUp was getting to meet and work with other YouTube creators.  Working by yourself can be a kind of an echo-chamber, where you ask yourself, “Self, is this a good idea?” and you answer, “of course it is!” and you don’t question it. You always do things your way, in your comfort zone.  Watching the other creators work and helping them with their shoots was an incredible education in how many ways you can go about getting great videos.

Our 2016 Class of YouTube NextUp:

YTNextUpClassof2016

Next time, I’ll include videos from my classmates and tell you more about their channels.

Remember to tell your friends about Socratica Studios, and encourage them to try our videos and subscribe!

KHH

Subscribe to Socratica Studios

Subscribe to Socratica Kids

 

 

 

Video

My first screen-cast for Socratica: “Balancing Chemical Equations”

I’ve been writing and editing and producing videos for Socratica for a little over a year now.  That’s been all behind-the-scenes work.  It’s been gratifying to see my ideas take form and finally appear as a finished little movie on YouTube.  Every now and then, however, I think maybe I have been a little too behind the scenes.  We get comments on our videos sometimes – that are being performed by actors – “You’re so smart! How do you know all these things?”  Errmmm.  Our actors are very bright and thoughtful people, but it is a bit of an ego blow to think that the audience doesn’t realize there is a whole production team writing and editing that material for our actors to perform.  I guess I know how most screenwriters feel.  When was the last time someone fawned over the brilliant minds behind our most beloved movies?  We give all of the attention to the faces on the big screen.

Not that I want to be signing autographs or anything. I think, for instance, that the cult of ego is taken to the extreme in some cases on online personalities.  Look at Sal Khan, for instance, who Bill Gates called “the best teacher I’ve ever seen.”  I guess he doesn’t know many teachers. That’s what happens when someone becomes an online celebrity instead of – well, instead of what I’m trying to be – a maker of beautiful, quality educational materials.  It’s really okay if people don’t know my name, as long as they have found the best videos that help them learn.

This week, I made my first attempt at a screencast video, on one of the most common problems for chemistry students, “balancing chemical equations.”  In this video, I work through 5 examples using the “inspection” or “trial-and-error” method.  In a follow-up video, I’ll demonstrate solving the same examples using the algebraic method.

My latest foray into educational videos is still somewhat anonymous – I won’t appear in these screencast videos except for my voice.  Maybe one of these days I’ll actually show my face in a video.  And then WATCH OUT WORLD!

KHH

FAQ: Why are your videos so short?

We didn’t have multimedia presentations in school.  We didn’t watch movies in class, and there was nothing projected anywhere on any kind of a screen. I didn’t even see an overhead projector until my AP Biology class my junior year in high school – because up until that time, anything that my teachers wanted to show me, they would write, painstakingly, in chalk, on a chalkboard.  My biology class required the quick display of lots of complicated pictures and diagrams, and by the time those could have been drawn, class would have been over.  Hence, the use of the projector.

Overhead projector 3M 02

Things didn’t change much for me in college.  I went to Caltech in the 90s, where professors still loved to use chalk – I remember the mathematician Tom Apostol using ALL of the chalkboards and he remembered what was written on every one, pointing to them like an orchestra conductor – and one poor chemistry professor who needed to wear a glove when he wrote because of his chalk allergy.  It was really only in my Biology classes that I saw projected complicated images.   My professors used the available technology when it was needed – but most of the time, you might not be able to tell the difference between our classroom and one from the 1920s.  Well, except for all of us girls in class.

Welcome to Powerpoint on PowerPoint

Welcome to Powerpoint on PowerPoint (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

It wasn’t until I was working in my first post-undergraduate job for a pharmaceutical company that I used PowerPoint in company presentations. I had charts, I had graphs, I had data to discuss – it made sense to be using PowerPoint.

By the time I started teaching, the game had changed.  There was an arms-race on in teaching – who could use the most technology in one lecture?  PowerPoint was the business, and all my lectures were PowerPoint-based.  My lecture notes were full of interesting and unusual visuals, and we used clickers to make the lectures interactive, but the next step was to include video.  OH MY GOD my students loved videos.

There was just one problem – there wasn’t much good video out there – a  few fuzzy recordings of teachers at a whiteboard. Plenty of pretty chemistry explosions: long on spectacle, short on substance. A few good molecular biology animations – behind a textbook paywall.

Later came the KhanAcademy recordings – unedited, full of mistakes, that ramble on sometimes for twenty minutes…if I used those, there would be no time for my own class.  And could I expect my students to watch them at home on their own time?  No way. My students groaned as if in actual pain if a video was ever 5 minutes long…3 minutes, maybe, they could handle.  It was the 30-45 second quick definition we really wanted. All the time, what was really holding my students back was – they couldn’t remember the difference between anion and cation.  Or what’s the definition of an acid or a base.  What we needed, basically, was a glossary, in a palatable form.

What I really wanted was a library of mini-videos I could plug into my lectures, or a nice set of short videos I could send to my students.  But there was nothing like that out there.

So I made them myself, with Socratica.

That’s why our videos are so short. There was a need for exactly that.

Don’t get me wrong.  We’re not stopping there.  We’ll make longer videos, for the students who need more, but we’ve started with these little nuggets first.   That’s why a lot of our videos have ” – a quick definition” in the title or description.

So subscribe to the Socratica YouTube channels, and stay tuned!

KHH

Here’s our English YouTube channel:

Socratica Studios

Our other channels are

Socratica Español,

Socratica Français,

Socratica Deutsch,

Socratica Русский,

Socratica Português, and

Socratica Kids.

And here are our phone apps in the Google Play store:

Socratica Phone Apps

Welcome to Socratica

A year ago, I left classroom teaching and focused my attentions on creating content for Socratica Studios, a company started by Michael Harrison (my tall dark and handsome husband).  We’ve been making “green screen” videos out of our own studio – on a variety of subjects (math, chemistry, art, opera, etc.) and in a variety of different languages (English, Spanish, French, German, Russian, Portuguese).  We are dedicated to making beautiful, high-quality learning materials available to everyone.  This is an offshoot of our original venture, making educational phone apps.

Here’s our English YouTube channel:

Socratica Studios

Our other channels are

Socratica Español,

Socratica Français,

Socratica Deutsch,

Socratica Русский,

Socratica Português, and

Socratica Kids.

And here are our phone apps in the Google Play store:

Socratica Phone Apps

Please subscribe, tell us what you think, and stay tuned for more developments!

KHH

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Our Spanish actress Liliana De Castro in the studio

fin_de_siecle_es_thumbnail

After a little work with Adobe Premiere and After Effects, Liliana is now in the French countryside, talking about art.